(Source: facebook.com, via bwansen)

And then [Vimes] realized why he was thinking like this.

It was because he wanted there to be conspirators.

It was much better to imagine men in some smoky room somewhere, made mad and cynical by privilege and power, plotting over the brandy.

You had to cling to this sort of image, because if you didn’t then you might have to face the fact that bad things happened because ordinary people, the kind who brushed the dog and told their children bedtime stories, were capable of then going out and doing horrible things to other ordinary people.

It was so much easier to blame it on Them.

It was bleakly depressing to think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone’s fault. If it was Us, what did that make Me? After all, I’m one of Us. I must be. I’ve certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No-one ever thinks of themselves as one of Them.

We’re always one of Us. It’s Them that do the bad things.

Terry Pratchett, Jingo (via captainofalltheships)

(via bwansen)

blastortoise:

okay but when you have holocaust survivors and people who were activists during the civil rights movement supporting mike brown and then KKK members and neo nazi’s supporting the officer you should be able to figure out which side is the right one.

(via bwansen)

thesummerofmark:

sometimes i wish living in a predominantly Christian culture meant that i could actually tell people stuff like “why don’t you check out the plank in your eye first, dude" and be understood

but nobody fucking reads the bible

Christendom is such a fucking disappointment

socialjusticekoolaid:

Love “Da Man Wit the Chips” but Jameila White is the new “Protest MVP.” #staywoke #trill 

(via mydickisthealpha)

Jesus saves, but Eris is a better lay!

Discordian proverb

(Source: thesummerofmark)

(Source: escapologie, via eristocrats)

internetpoetry:

image macro by NIA

internetpoetry:

image macro by NIA

(via eristocrats)

thesummerofmark:

in 1 dimension, you can’t move two points past one another, but in 2 you can

in 2 dimensions, you can’t move two lines past one another, but in 3 you can

in 3 dimensions, you can’t move two planes past one another, but in 4 you can

eerieearthling:

This particular moment in Star Trek is actually quite important. A lot of people don’t realise that understanding something is not the same as approving of something. This particular episode (A Taste of Armageddon) had a civilization where war was fought on computers instead of on the battlefield and instead of people dying in combat they would send the calculated amount of “casualities” into a camp to die. Kirk is outraged completely by this and rightly should be, but Spock is not so overtly disapproving. He understands why they might think their solution is better for their civilization and takes the time to think about why they are doing it. Even though he can understand why, he still believes it is wrong for them to be doing it. 

There is a separation between understanding something and  approving of something that a lot of people seem to miss. 

(via doitformysanity)

kropotkindersurprise:

Two ways of dealing with tear gas grenades from comrades in Turkey: Either submerge them in water. Make sure you can close off the container cause the gas will still spread for a while. Or throw them in the fire so the gas burns off before it can spread.

(via kallistis)

The Real World ™

(Source: oddpup)

cognitivedissonance:

Tonight in Ferguson, Mo. Even CNN is calling out police brutality.

We are watching history unfold. Do not stand down. Spread the word.

No justice, no peace.

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)